First 30 Days

Tips for the first 30 days with new dog
The first 30 days with a new family are a crucial adjustment period when you adopt a rescue dog. Your new dog will likely be confused and worried about where he is and what you expect from him. It’s an unfamiliar place with strange people, but setting up some clear rules and routines for your dog with your family members will be helpful in making the transition as smooth as possible.

.

Ways to get everyone on a routine
To enjoy success with your new dog, plan out a basic daily structure and routine. Decide on a few rules before you bring him home and make sure everyone who lives in the home has input, is aware of the rules, and agrees to follow them. This ensures consistency for your dog and allows him to meet your expectations. Doing things at the same time each day, such as walking, feeding, grooming, cuddling, and playing, will help him settle in and relax faster.

.

How long will it take the pet to adjust
It could take anywhere from three days to three months for your new dog to settle in. Just be patient with him and show him through your actions that he is safe with you. Here are some general adjustment guidelines:
.

  • Three days. Think of this as detox. Your home is a lot quieter than the shelter. If can be overwhelming for many dogs, particularly those who have been in a loud, busy shelter for months. Positively reinforce the rules with understanding and patience.
    .
    .
  • Thirty days. You dog is probably getting used to your schedule and learning his daily routine. He is starting to figure out when the next meal is coming, that you walk him at the same time every morning, and that he gets to go out for regular potty breaks.
    .
    .
  • Three months. Most dogs realize at this point that they are home. It’s a process to get here, but with a good behavior plan, the right tools, and plenty of patience, the two of you can create a great relationship.

.

How do I break bad habits
If your dog has some bad habits you want to break, be consistent with your hand motions and verbal cues. A hand signal combined with one-word commands is perfect. Be persistent with your training by setting aside time daily to practice until your dog consistently responds to your commands.

.

(4) National Rescue Organizations 
In addition to the rescue shelter where you adopted your dog, following are a few helpful rescue adoption organizations:.

.

What do I do if I continue to have problems
Some dogs experience anxiety in the form of diarrhea and an upset stomach. House-trained dogs may regress and have multiple accidents. Whatever the problem, it may take a while for him to realize he has a forever home with you. Turn to your resources if you are unable to resolve the issue on your own. With the right balance of affection, understanding, patience, and discipline, your rescue dog will become a loving, grateful, and loyal companion

Got a Question? 


Contact
Sending