Good vs Bad Grains

 

Good Grains and Bad Grains
Long before dog food came from a bag, canines would stalk and capture a natural, protein-rich diet. However, with the introduction of mass-produced dog kibble came inexpensive fillers such as soy, wheat, and corn to keep costs down and create bulk. Many commercial dog foods today still list wheat or corn as the primary ingredient. All grains are a great source of carbohydrates and provide your dog's body with energy. So it is not always the case that grain-free is the healthiest choice for your dog’s food. In fact, here are some grains that are good for your pet.

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What are Good Grains

  • Oatmeal:
    Oatmeal is particularly rich in heart-healthy antioxidants. It reduces the risk of high blood pressure, prevents arterial clogs, keeps cholesterol levels down, and helps to boost your dog’s immune system. It also contains high levels of fiber, and is a naturally gluten-free food high in grain protein and low in fat.
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  • Brown Rice:
    An excellent source of manganese and high in fiber, brown rice also is a rich source of selenium and magnesium. Brown rice helps stabilize blood sugar levels, promotes weight loss, and has an abundance of antioxidant properties. Because it is high in fiber, it can help your dog overcome constipation.
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  • Flax Seed:
    The blue-flowering flax plant is grown throughout the world. In the northern hemisphere, it grows primarily in Canada and the northern United States. Its tiny, gold, or brown possess a nutty, savory taste. Flax seed oil, which results from cold-pressing the seeds, is high in fat but does not contain the fiber located in other portions of the seed.

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What are Bad Grains

  • Corn, corn meal, or corn gluten meal:
    Corn is one of the most inexpensive crops to produce, and, therefore, an attractive ingredient for manufacturers of pet food. Unfortunately, because of this, it is often the most abundant ingredient in many commercial foods. Corn contributes to the many diseases associated with diets rich in carbohydrate, including cancer, diabetes, chronic inflammation, and obesity.
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  • Soy:
    Soy is one of the most frequent reasons for allergens in companion pets and can result in serious damages to the hormonal system. Even though carnivores were never intended to eat soy, it is commonly used in dog food as a cheap replacement for meat protein.
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  • Wheat and wheat gluten:
    The persistent and repetitive exposure of wheat to pet animals has produced intolerance's and allergies to wheat and wheat gluten. Wheat gluten is another product frequently used as an inexpensive protein source in dog foods.
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Disclaimer: We are NOT licensed vets. DO NOT try to diagnose or treat animals based off this or any other information you find on the internet. This page is just basic information to help bring awareness to different health issues that are common in pets. If you pet is having any kind of medical issues, please seek professional treatment from a licensed vet who is trained and set up to handle such matters.
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