People Possessive Dogs

How to Stop Your Dog From Being People Possessive


Canine possessiveness, also called resource guarding, is a common problem. Dogs can be possessive of anything, causing them to guard toys, another dog, food, their bed, or a human. Some dogs are predisposed to this because of personality tendencies. Others have learned the behavior, which contributes confusion about who is the pack leader in the home.


Can anything be done to change it
The family dynamics need to change, including the relationship with person over which your dog is possessive. Other family members need to be willing to develop a bond with your dog. It is essential to break the behavior and will help your dog see that other people are good, too.

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Tips
When a dog is overly possessive of his owner, he is often acting out of insecurity. When he growls, people naturally move away, reinforcing the behavior. Here are a few tips to extinguish the behavior:
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  1. Commit to solving the problem. The object of your dog's obsession must invest in making a change in their behavior to help your dog. If they are willing to make changes, they can help your dog overcome his possessiveness.
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  2. Don’t allow your dog on the furniture. If your dog protects you when you sit on the couch or lie on the bed, don’t allow him on the furniture, at least temporarily. Often the furniture triggers the possessiveness.
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  3. Don't tolerate possessiveness of toys or food. Dogs that are possessive of their owners often guard their toys and food. It’s essential to follow consistent rules and to teach your dog that everything belongs to you, even his bed, food, and toys.

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Dogs with firm obedience skills are more respectful and less possessive of their owners. They listen to commands and have a high level of self-confidence, which is important for dogs to feel comfortable sharing you with others..
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