Adopting a Senior

Pros and Cons of Adopting a Senior Dog
Veterinarians agree that dogs are classified as senior around the age of seven. However, size does matter; the smaller the dog, the later in life the dog matures. Shelter dogs as young as five years old can still have problems finding a loving home because many prospective adopters believe the dogs are already old. However, well-loved and exercised dogs of any age can remain playful, active, puppy-like, and happy well into their senior years.

.

Pros
Older dogs lose their homes for a variety of reasons. Most of them have little to do with the dog and more to do with family changes, such as death of the owner or a new baby. There are many advantages of adopting a senior dog, such as:
.

  • Appreciates loving attention
    .
  • Socialized, instant companion
    .
  • Easy to assess size and temperament
    .
  • Quick to learn rules and expectations
    .
  • Familiar with obedience training and house manners

.

Cons
A lot of dog owners are worried that senior dogs have bad habits that can’t be broken. However, dogs are remarkably open-hearted and resilient. Many fully overcome their histories in just a few days, while others carry baggage a bit longer. A few disadvantages to consider when adopting a senior dog include:
.

  • Concern that an older dog won't bond with you
    .
  • Fear that your time together will be brief
    .
  • Risk of higher medical bills

.

Working with your adopted dog to help him overcome necessary hurdles to appreciate his new life can be an amazingly fulfilling experience. The result is a loving, long-term relationship.

Instead of passing on older dogs in the shelter, take a moment to spend a little time with them. You will probably find that adopting a senior dog is one of the most satisfying things you’ve done. You’ve provided a safe, warm home for an older dog in need and saved a life. He’ll repay you with loyalty and affection for the rest of his life.

Got a Question? 


Contact
Sending

.