Kidney and Bladder Stones

 

What are kidney and bladder stones
Well first off, the urinary system is responsible for filtering, forming and secreting urine.  The urinary system is made up of the bladder, kidneys (which filter blood & produce urine), ureters (the tubes that flow the urine from the kidneys to the bladder) and then the urethra ( the tube that flows the urine from the bladder to the outside of the body) Dogs have natural minerals in their bodies just like humans and Kidney | Bladder Stones form when certain chemicals in the body clump together. A stone can stay in the kidney or travel elsewhere in the urinary tract.  Since there are different minerals in the body (calcium, magnesium, ammonia etc...) there are different types of stones. Mineral wastes sometimes are only slightly soluble, so if they move slowly through the urinary system, they can crystallize and actually become stones.

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Causes of kidney and bladder stones
If the concentration of mineral salts are too high in the urine, they precipitate out, layer upon layer forming stones.  Urinary Tract infections, or any infection within the kidneys, dietary factors, certain supplements & medications, genetic defects, or underlying illness all can contribute to the development of stones. Kidney or bladder stones can happen to any breed, but some breeds are more prone to getting them like: miniature schnauzers, miniature poodles, Yorkshire terriers, Lhasa apso, shih tzu, bichon and cocker spaniels.
 
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Symptoms of kidney and bladder stones
Bloody urine, vomiting, abdominal pain, recurrent UTI's.
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Diagnosing kidney and bladder stones
There are several different ways the vet can diagnose kidney stones. They might do one or several of the following tests: urinalysis, blood work, bacterial urine culture, x-rays, ultrasound or urography. 
 
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Treatment for kidney and bladder stones
Treatment is a case by case decision only the vet can make. Some treatments might include: fluid therapy, antibiotics, dietary changes, or even removal by surgery or by lithography (this uses shock waves to break the large stone into smaller pieces so it can pass)
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Disclaimer: We are NOT licensed vets. DO NOT try to diagnose or treat animals based off this or any other information you find on the internet. This page is just basic information to help bring awareness to different health issues that are common in pets. If you pet is having any kind of medical issues, please seek professional treatment from a licensed vet who is trained and set up to handle such matters.
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