Mange in Dogs and Puppies

 

What is Mange
Mange is a skin disease found in many mammals and is caused by mites that burrow beneath the skin.


(3) Types of Mange
1.  Cheyletiella Mange: also known as walking dandruff

2.  Sarcoptic Mange: also known as scabies and prefers hairless skin
3.  Demodectic Mange: lives in hair follicles
          a. Localized - usually isolated on the face, does not involve more than two body regions and no more than four spots total.
          b. Generalized - the entire dog is affected (become quite ill with fever etc...)
          c. Demodectic pododermatitis - confined to the paws, hardest mange to get rid of.

 

Symptoms 
 Symptoms vary depending on the type of mange.

1. Cheyletiella Mange: identified by the dandruff dusting that occurs over the dog's head, neck and back..
2. Sarcoptic Mange: symptoms are crusty ear tips, fierce itching, and hair loss, particularly on the ears, elbows, legs, and face in the early stages. Later on, the hair loss spreads throughout the body.
3. Demodectic Mange:  has 3 types of symptoms. (localized, generalized and demodectic pododermatitis) each one is explained below.
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♦ Localized symptoms include thinning of the hair around the eyes and mouth and on the front legs that evolves into patches of hair loss, redness, or even pustules
♦ Generalized - patchy fur, skin infections, bald spots, scaly skin affect the entire dog
♦ Demodectic pododermatitis - bacterial infections usually accompany this condition which is isolated to the paws..

 

Is Mange Contagious
1. Cheyletiella Mange is highly contagious and is transferred by direct contact to other pets and humans. Mites are transferred through contact of either the dog or places where the dog as laid and left mites.
2. Sarcoptic Mange is contagious to dogs and humans. Mites are transferred through contact of either the dog or places where the dog as laid and left mites. Fortunately scabies in humans is self-limiting, that is the mite can burrow under the skin and cause itching, but cannot complete its life cycle on humans and dies within a few weeks.
3. Demodectic Mange is not considered contagious but under certain circumstances some contagion is possible to other dogs but not to cats or humans.

 

Treatment
Mange should be treated under the direction of your veterinarian no matter which form of mange. The following information is only to give you an idea of possible treatments. Please note that if your pet has mange that all of its combs, brushes, toys, bedding, any carpeting or upholstered furniture he has been on, etc. should be treated with an insecticide recommended by your veterinarian.
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 1. Cheyletiella Mange - medicated baths or lime-sulphur dips - applications of analgesic solutions, powders or ointments.
2. Sarcoptic Mange - Amitraz, Mitaban or lime-sulphur dips - Selamectin (Revolution) topical solution - Ivermectin oral medication.
  3. Demodectic Mange - Below Are Basic Treatments for the 3 Different Types of Demodectic Mange.
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♦ Localized - requires no treatment - usually resolves itself
♦ Generalized - Minor, localized cases are often treated with medicated shampoos and not treated with agents aimed at killing mites as these infestations often resolve within several weeks in young dogs. Demodectic mange with secondary infection is treated with antibiotics and medicated shampoos as well as parasiticidal agents
♦ Demodectic pododermatitis - Ivermectin is often prescribed

 

How is Mange Diagnosed
1. Cheyletiella Mange - the vet will do a painless skin scrape and microscopic evaluation - these mites are large enough to be seen by the naked eye - they appear reddish in color..
2. Sarcoptic Mange - the vet will do a painless skin scrape and microscopic evaluation..
3. Demodectic Mange - the vet will do a painless skin scrape and microscopic evaluation - sometimes a biopsy is needed if the infection is too deep.

 

Causes
It is the current theory that the mange mites are transferred to the puppies from the mom. The puppies will develop an immunity to them within a few weeks. These mites live on most of the animals but are not activated unless their immune systems become compromised.
1. Cheyletiella Mange - transmission by direct contact with an affected animal or where an infected dog has laid and left mites.
2. Sarcoptic Mange - transmission by direct contact with an affected animal or where an infected dog has laid and left mites.
3. Demodectic Mange - the demodex mites are found on all dogs but they develop an immunity to them by about one week old - If a dog has a suppressed or immature immune system then the mites can become active

 

Prevention 
1. Because mange occurs when a dog has a low immune system the best way to try to prevent it is to feed your pet a quality diet which will help it be healthier and more resistant to mange.
2. Know what mange looks like and what the common symptoms are so you'll know it when you see it in one of your animals. If you are vigilant, you can get it treated before it becomes a big problem or spreads to your other pets.
2. Check on the other pets that your pet comes in contact with. If your dog visits the neighbor's dog, watch for symptoms of mange in the neighbor's dog.
3. Keep your animals clean and groomed. If your pet is groomed regularly, any mite populations on your dog will be kept under control. Most dogs can and should be bathed monthly.
4. Take your dog to the vet regularly. A veterinarian can ensure that your dog is in good health and will be able to spot issues with mange before the untrained eye can, helping you gain control of issues before they become full-blown problems

 

What Age 
Mange is generally found in young dogs whose immune systems haven’t fully developed or older dogs who have a weakened immune system due to an illness, stress or some other cause.
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Disclaimer: We are NOT licensed vets. DO NOT try to diagnose or treat animals based off this or any other information you find on the internet. This page is just basic information to help bring awareness to different health issues that are common in pets. If you pet is having any kind of medical issues, please seek professional treatment from a licensed vet who is trained and set up to handle such matters.

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