Pancreatitis in Dogs

Pancreatitis in Dogs
How to Take Care of a Dog with Pancreatitis. The pancreatic gland is found in your dog's abdomen. It produces enzymes that aid in the food digestion process and hormones, such as insulin, that are secreted into the blood. If the digestive enzymes are activated in the pancreas before they are released into the blood, they begin digesting the pancreas itself. The result of self-digestion is severe inflammation known as Pancreatitis, which creates pain and tenderness in the abdomen. Pancreatic disorders frequently occur in dogs, so it is important to understand the symptoms, causes, and treatment options.

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Signs of canine pancreatitis
You need to be aware of the indications of pancreatitis in your dog so you can get treatment for him quickly. Typical signs include:

  • Dehydration
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  • Lack of appetite
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  • Bloody diarrhea
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  • Inability to walk
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  • Frequent vomiting
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  • Drinking excessive amounts
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  • Abdominal tenderness or pain

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Causes of pancreatitis
While the exact cause of pancreatitis is not known, there are numerous contributing factors:

  • Obesity
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  • Infectious diseases
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  • High blood fat content
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  • Trauma to the abdomen

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How is canine pancreatitis diagnosed
Your vet will need to do a thorough physical exam, including a complete evaluation of your dog's clinical signs. You will also need to answer different questions about your dog's overall health history. If, after examining your dog, pancreatitis is suspected, a blood sample for laboratory analysis may be needed. The lab results will indicate the lipase, amylase, and cholesterol levels in addition to white blood cell count.

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What are the treatment options
Dietary management can help avoid canine pancreatitis, such as:

  • Overweight. A weight loss program should be initiated.
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  • Predisposition. Diets low in dietary fats are ideal.
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  • Hyperlipemia. A high fiber, low fat diet should be fed to your dog if he has high blood fat content.
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  • Talk to your veterinarian about the correct diet for your dog, and avoid treats such as meat or meat scraps that are high in fat.

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Disclaimer: We are NOT licensed vets. DO NOT try to diagnose or treat animals based off this or any other information you find on the internet. This page is just basic information to help bring awareness to different health issues that are common in pets. If you pet is having any kind of medical issues, please seek professional treatment from a licensed vet who is trained and set up to handle such matters.
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