Allergies

Common Allergies in Dogs
A dog exhibits allergic symptoms when his immune system identifies specific everyday allergens as bad. Although the allergens prevalent in most settings are safe for many animals, a dog with allergies can have extreme reactions to them.

Common allergens include:

  • Beef
  • Dairy
  • Chicken
  • Lamb
  • Fish
  • Corn
  • Wheat
  • Soy
  • Dander
  • Mold spores
  • Cigarette smoke
  • Food ingredients
  • House dust mites
  • Cleaning products
  • Grass, weed, and tree pollen
  • Flea control products and flea bites

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Symptoms of allergies
As your dog’s body tries eliminate allergens, a variety of digestive, respiratory, and skin symptoms may appear, such as:

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Itchy base of tail or back
  • Sneezing and runny eyes
  • Itchy ears and ear infections
  • Constant licking and scratching
  • Red, scabbed, or Itchy scabbed skin
  • Snoring caused by an inflamed throat

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How are dog allergies diagnosed
If your dog’s irritated, itchy skin is not improved by initial veterinary treatment, allergy testing by a veterinary dermatologist is next logical step. The ideal diagnostic test is an intradermal skin analysis. When the allergy is identified, your vet will recommend a specific diet.

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Can dog allergies be prevented
The best allergy treatment approach is to identify, extract, and eliminate the irritating allergens from the area.

  • Fleas. Make sure to begin a flea control program for all of your pets before the season starts.
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  • Dust. Wash your pet's bedding weekly and vacuum your entire house, including curtains and furniture, at least twice a week.
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  • Bathing. A weekly bath can help reduce itching and remove environmental allergens and pollens from your dog’s skin.
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  • Diet. If you think your dog has a food allergy, he’ll need a hydrolyzed protein or special prescription diet.

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Allergy medications
Because some substances cannot be eliminated from the environment, your vet may prescribe medications to manage the allergic reactions. Some examples include:

  • Cortisone
  • Antihistamines
  • Allergy injections
  • Fatty acid supplements
  • Flea-prevention products
  • Immune modulating drugs

 

.Disclaimer: We are NOT licensed vets. DO NOT try to diagnose or treat animals based off this or any other information you find on the internet. This page is just basic information to help bring awareness to different health issues that are common in pets. If you pet is having any kind of medical issues, please seek professional treatment from a licensed vet who is trained and set up to handle such matters.
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  • Environmental allergies
  • Hot spots
  • Abrasions and other skin problems in dogs.
  • Relief of itchy or irritated skin.
  • Alcohol-free, no-sting formula
  • Will not affect topical flea control products
  • All natural
  • Developed by a Veterinarian
  • Made in the U.S.A.

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